Picture Gallery


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CBD and Ward 77 Buildings


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The sad case of the demolition of the lovely tower of the old St. Georges Cathedral
 











Views of the original St. Georges Cathedral and Tower before it was demolished to make way for the new . 
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City’s historical Stadsfontein Vault springs into shape following its restoration:

One of Cape Town’s original main water springs, the Stadsfontein Vault situated in the Homestead Park in Oranjezicht, has received a freshening investment of R175 000 for its restoration and conservation, in line with applicable legislation and approvals. The original spring, which dates back to 1686 and was covered with a vault in 1813, is still a water source for Capetonians and visitors today. This investment illustrates the City’s commitment to restoring and conserving sites of historical importance, which can be enjoyed by all Capetonians and visitors.

 
 
 
Following five months of restoration work, one of Cape Town’s two perennial springs, the Stadsfontein Vault (or Main Spring) has been refreshed to ensure that it remains a valued historical site and water source for residents and visitors.
 
‘The Stadsfontein Vault in the Homestead Park is a unique place in our city, being one of only two perennial springs in Cape Town. To have been able to restore one of Cape Town’s original water springs to full operation is an example of how we are continually looking to conserve and maintain sites of historical importance. The fact that this spring is still a water source for Capetonians today makes this restoration project even more significant,’ said the City’s Mayoral Committee Member for Energy, Environmental and Spatial Planning, Councillor Johan van der Merwe.  
 
The project to restore the vault, which included addressing matters related to flooding and the stabilisation of the wall, was undertaken in terms of a Heritage Western Cape permit. The permit required the services of a suitably qualified contractor, a water engineer to resolve flooding, a structural engineer to investigate the stability of the embankment, and a historical archaeologist for monitoring.
 
The first step was to remove the nearby tree. The entire vault was then exposed by means of hand excavation in order to repair cracks and re-whitewash the structure. A stone retaining wall was discovered at the back of the vault, and it was found that this should be sufficiently stable once the loose soil was removed and replaced with mortar. This was done in a way that differentiates between the back of the vault structure (plaster finish and whitewash clearly evident) and the later stone rubble wall.
 
‘Through this restoration project, we found that the blockage of the Stadsfontein Vault was due to a water metering device. This restricted the flow downstream of the Stadsfontein Vault, resulting in the flooding from beneath the vault. The device has now been removed and we can confirm that the flooding has, subsequently, been alleviated,’ said Councillor Van der Merwe.
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FOOLS GOLD, or all is not Gold that glitters on Lion's Head:

http://www.heritageportal.co.za/article/lions-head-gold-mine


The Cape Peninsula has several mementos of people hopeful to find 'riches beyond the dreams of avarice', such as in Silvermine reserve, Manganese diggings at Hout Bay, and use the link above to have a look at this historic article on the Heritage Portal website about the "Gold Rush" on Lion's Head.

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De Groote Kerk, oldest church in SA (1678, rebuilt in 1841), an interesting combination of Greek and Gothic building traditions. The magnificent pulpit, crafted in 1779, still graces the church today. 
The organ, the largest in SA, was installed in 1954 and has 5917 pipes.
 
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Historic Photographs Collection: (Please help add to this)
Belvedere Avenue circa1920
Old Cape Town view showing the Lutheran Church reprinted in the Heritage Portal Newsletter 30th March 2017.

You can find many collections of old or vintage photos of Cape Town with an Internet search, but this link has the pictures   submitted by our residents. Click on it to view the pictures: https://picasaweb.google.com/108615076844148186170/HistoricPhotosOfCapeTown

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Now here are links to more old photos:

This link is one of many that takes you to interesting pictures of the City in years gone by:
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